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Jay Chou Signs Up As Tudor Ambassador

The “King of Asian Pop” was #BornToDare

FOLLOWING after David Beckham, Lady Gaga and New Zealand’s All Blacks rugby squad, musician, actor and director Jay Chou is now also an ambassador for Tudor and the brand’s #BornToDare campaign.

With “Born To Dare,” Tudor picks ambassadors whose works came as a result of a daring approach to life. Chou, Tudor says, is one such talent, and so rightfully belongs in this family.

Chou, while hard to dispute as the “King of Asian Pop,” nonetheless leans toward the classical stuff. He grew up in Taiwan among a family of teachers and started playing the piano at the four — his gift for music was immediately apparent. He later on picked up the cello. He says Chopin is his favorite composer.

Chou

Chou is also a mean violin and guitar player, and won’t shy away from percussions, too. Professionally, he started out as a lyricist and composer, then took to the mic in 2000 as he pioneered in fusing Western music styles like R&B and electronica with Asian classical music — dubbed “Chou Style.”

After selling millions of several different albums, he then branched out into acting, proving himself as adept in this craft whether on the big screen or the stage. Chou starred in numerous Asian blockbusters and in major Hollywood

productions, boasting a filmography that includes writing and directing two critically acclaimed feature films.

Chou never completely turned his back on music, with his albums consistently rising to top of the Asian charts. In 2007 he started his own record company, JVR Music, which pioneered the “Chou Style” cross-cultural fusion embraced by a stable of talents under the JVR Music label. So, yeah, you could add “producer” to his long list of job titles.

Chou
Chou

While at it, add ”director,” too. Chou has helmed numerous music videos, including his own, and is even recognized in Asia and the US as a talented advertising director.

Tudor says that Chou’s taste and obvious love for culture, as well as his solid CV on a variety of artistic fields, are what also drew him to the Tudor 1926 — a rather simple and classical watch with modern mechanical bits. Surely, though, the gifted artist should also be able to appreciate Tudor’s Black Bay Chrono, especially the two-tone steel-and-gold version, for the timepiece’s capacity to fuse classical aesthetics with a youthful vibe, versatility with utter competence.

Like Chou, these watches are multi-talented.