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Brian M. Afuang

Bronzed Beauty

Maurice Lacroix adds a dash of drama to its Aikon Automatic Bronze by going for good blues

WHILE it’s true the steel version was cast in the mold of 1970s luxury sport watches, Maurice Lacroix’s Aikon range actually makes a convincing case that it is but an edgier, sleeker evolution of the brand’s Calypso line, which defined 1990s idea of ornamentation. Having said this, Maurice Lacroix having draped in 2017 the Aikon in a bronze case, only a year after its debut, did lend the collection a stronger, more distinct personality. Now, this bronzed, limited-edition Aikon piece gets a new blue-dial rendition, replacing the “tropical” treatment it used to rock.            

The new Aikon Automatic Bronze (a quartz version is also available, which wears a 44-millimeter case) is a self-winding movement-ticked piece housed in a 42-millimeter bronze case, which is now matched to a gradated blue dial with a horizontal relief pattern. Limited to 500 pieces, this bronze-and-blue three-hander expands the already extensive Aikon collection, which counts in automatics and quartz-powered versions, three-hand and chronograph variants, a selection of case and dial colorways, and even pieces for the ladies (some of which adorned by diamonds). What is common among the lot, though, are their integrated cases and bracelets (or straps). and a bezel seemed to be held in place by six pairs of arms.

The new Aikon Automatic Bronze sticks to this brief, although the material in which it comes guarantee no two pieces will look exactly the same. Bronzed watches, as most everybody knows, are meant to develop a patina much faster and individualized than timepieces housed in other types of metals. 

Complementing both the case and the blue dial of the Aikon Automatic Bronze are applied hour markers and 3, 6, 9 and 12 numerals plated in pink gold. Keeping the symmetry of the dial layout is the deletion of a date window. A calf leather strap in the same blue hue as the dial rounds out the coherence of the model’s color palette.

At the back of the watch, visible through a sapphire crystal window, is Maurice Lacroix’s cal. ML 115, said to be based on a Selitta SW 200 workhorse. This 26-jewel movement, which oscillates at 28,800vph and has a power reserve of 28 hours, receives bits of rhodium plating, as well as perlage, colimacon and Cotes de Geneve flourishes.

Which seems only proper for this bronzed beauty.